agency chicago dating - Army romances army dating

Some of these scumbags are using the pictures of soldiers who were killed in action to run their scams. Someone told me once they were dating a General and she even had pictures. What’s funny is he’ll type over the only legitimate information on the card and replace it with something that makes no sense. The pictures they use many times on military IDs are so fake and it’s so obvious.

Real military ID pictures basically look like a mugshot – solid background with him in uniform and basically only showing his face (maybe the very top of his shoulders).

The victim and the scammer create an online relationship.

If there were soldiers being denied leave after being overseas for years at a time, it would be ALL over the news. Now, we certainly do have troops in other countries.

However, they don’t talk about it and they certainly don’t tell you they are on a “top secret mission”. He says he is not allowed to talk about what he does, however, he has cleared it with his CO that he can tell you enough to make you believe he is who he says. If he truly is not allowed to share any details about his job, his CO doesn’t even allow him to talk about it with family, much less someone he met on the internet.

A growing epidemic in the world today is the Online Romance Scam.

Generally, a victim is contacted by someone online through various social media or a legitimate dating website.

Someone sent me one the other day that not only looked nothing like a military ID (more like a business card for a recruiter), it had a picture of a soldier who was obviously at a military ball or some other formal event as he had a bow tie with his dress uniform. The Army posted this example on their Facebook page: So exactly which one are you dating?

Oh and by the way, I’ve never seen a soldier unless it was on an official page (such as the base commander’s page) that uses his rank in his name. I’m assuming if you’re falling for this, you’ve never been in a military town.All military dependents are covered by Tricare, which for the most part is amazing insurance. Real soldiers aren’t paying out of pocket for their kid’s medical care. First, pictures can be grabbed from anywhere on the internet – there’s no guarantee you’re talking to that person. Some use totally fake pictures in uniforms that are all messed up – I’ve seen Army uniforms with Air Force tapes and Navy insignia – no joke.I had a c-section and was in the hospital in a private room for three days. They may very well be using the picture of a real soldier but that doesn’t mean you’re talking to him. I’ve seen very badly doctored military ID cards where it’s obvious he’s typed over information on the card.Eventually, the scammer will ask for help, for various reasons, involving the victim sending money.After the scammer gets all the money they can from the victim, the scammer drops communication, leaving the victim dumbfounded, hurt, confused, and out of a lot of money, which is rarely recovered.Also, any special operations soldier worth his beret will not reveal his location to someone he doesn’t know (or even someone he does! Sometimes with this tactic, they will ask you to email/send mail to the CO to ask for permission. I know some very unlucky people but this is just over the top.

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